josh blog

Ordinary language is all right.

One could divide humanity into two classes:
those who master a metaphor, and those who hold by a formula.
Those with a bent for both are too few, they do not comprise a class.

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21 Aug '11 09:17:30 AM

'…never better than natural…'

8 Aug '11 07:46:14 AM

'…inimical to all attempts to sow the seeds of the new, to engage in daring experiments, to desire freely.'

5 Aug '11 07:21:25 AM

'…so that it matters not only what some I or other says but that it is some particular I who desires in some specific place to say it. If my counting fails to matter, I am mad. It is being uncounted—being left out, as if my story were untellable—that makes what I say (seem) perverse, that makes me cold. The surmise that we have become unable to count one another, to count for one another, is philosophically a surmise that we have lost the capacity to think, that we are stupified. I call this condition living our skepticism.'

5 Aug '11 05:28:09 AM

'…writing as a message from prison…'

4 Aug '11 08:01:22 AM

'Who would dare reproach us for making use of this life and world which constitute our horizon?'

4 Aug '11 07:59:45 AM

'The young person has become an outcast, is skeptical about all customs and concepts; now he knows: in every age things were different; it does not matter what you are.'

4 Aug '11 07:10:18 AM

'Self-understanding for Montaigne is dialogue with self. It is a questioning addressed to the opaque being he is and awaits a response from. It is like "essaying" or "experimenting on" himself. He has in view a questioning without which reason's purity would be illusory and in the end impure. Some are amazed that he should want to speak about even the details of his mood and temperament. It is because for him every doctrine, when it is separated from what we do, threatens to be mendacious; and he imagined a book in which for once there would be expressed not only ideas but also the very life in which they appear and which modifies their meaning.'

2 Aug '11 08:43:15 AM

'to darken the heavens, to blot out the sun, to cast suspicion on joy, to deprive hope of its value, to paralyse the active hand'

27 Jul '11 09:59:12 AM

'… the two pacifying formulae of Epicurus, which are capable of being applied to very many questions. Reduced to their simplest form they would perhaps become: firstly, if that is how things are they do not concern us; secondly, things may be thus but they may also be otherwise.'